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Witness to the Word: A Commentary on John 1 Karl Barth

Witness to the Word: A Commentary on John 1

Karl Barth

Published September 24th 2015
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
284 pages
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 About the Book 

Karl Barths lectures on the first chapter of the Gospel of John, delivered at Muenster in 1925-26 and at Bonn in 1933, came at an important time in his life, when he was turning his attention more fully to dogmatics. Theological interpretation wasMoreKarl Barths lectures on the first chapter of the Gospel of John, delivered at Muenster in 1925-26 and at Bonn in 1933, came at an important time in his life, when he was turning his attention more fully to dogmatics. Theological interpretation was thus his primary concern, especially the relation between revelation and the witness to revelation, which helped to shape his formulation of the role of the written (and spoken) word vis-a-vis the incarnate Word.The text is divided into three sections - John 1:1-18, 19-34, 35-51, with the largest share of the book devoted to the first section. Each section begins with Barths own translation, followed by verse-by -verse and phrase-by-phrase commentary on the Greek text. Although Barths interpretation is decidedly theological, he does take up questions of philology and textual criticism more thoroughly than in his other works.Much has happened in Johannine scholarship since these lectures were first delivered, yet they remain valuable today - 100 years after Barths birth - both for their insights into the gospel and into Karl Barth.Witness to the Word is an important exposition in its own right, as well as a clue to Barths development as a theologian. I was struck, first, by Barths meticulous attention to exegetical detail, in dialogue with the best available scholarship- and, second, by the foundational character of this exposition for the doctrine of the Word of God he developed later in his Dogmatics.John D. Godsey, Wesley Theological SeminaryKarl Barth (1886-1968), the Swiss Reformed professor and pastor, was once described by Pope Pius XII as the most important theologian since Thomas Aquinas. As principal author of The Barmen Declaration, he was the intellectual leader of the German Confessing Church - the Protestant group that resisted the Third Reich. Barths teaching career spanned nearly five decades. Removed from his post at Bonn by the Nazis in late 1934, Barth moved to Basel where he taught until 1962. Among Barths many books, sermons, and essays are The Epistle to the Romans, Humanity of God, Evangelical Theology, and Church Dogmatics.